Home Insulation Installers Granbury

Is it time for Cavity Wall Insulation Cost in Granbury? What is the best type to choose? Let us focus on four specific types. One is blown attic insulation the other is batt insulation. Each type has pros and cons. However, which is the best choice for you.

Blown In Attic Insulation

One of the best advantages of blown attic insulation over batt is that the blown style covers everything; while there can be open areas in the batt type.

Blown In Fiberglass Insulation

When you’re looking to have your home or building insulated with spray foam insulation, you have a couple of product choices. Whether you go with closed foam or open foam insulation, the differences in their make will make a big difference in which one will work best for your needs.

Radiant barrier insulation has one reflective side that is made from an aluminum coating. Any radiant barrier insulation can be installed in an existing or new home. The reflective side of the barrier insulation is made to face the open air pocket of the surface.

Almost all Cavity Wall Insulation Cost in Granbury are tested and rated as fireproof. If for some strange reason you find one that is not, stay away from that product.

Acoustic Insulation

Is Radiant Barrier Worth Adding To Your House?

Adding insulation to your attic is a great way to save energy, but there are a number of choices that you need to sort through. What is the best type for your situation? What is the best location for this added insulation? How much should you add?

The first thing that you need to determine is how much insulation you already have. Measure the depth and determine the type. Then multiply the depth by the appropriate value: Cellulose: 3.1, Fiberglass Batt or Blown: 3.7, Closed-Cell Foam: 6.2, Open-Cell Foam: 3.6.

Before you move any further to insulate your attic, you should make sure that you have any knob and tube wiring in your attic that would be covered by insulation replaced. The wires in this type of system need to be in the open air in order to dissipate heat. If they are surrounded by insulation this will trap the heat and cause a fire hazard.

Once you have calculated the R-value of your insulation, you need to determine how much more you should add. Energy Starr has developed recommended levels of attic insulation for every Zone throughout the US. See map at Energy Star and chart below. However, what it boils down to is most houses don't have enough insulation. R-30 is the bare minimum and unless you live in south Florida, the recommended amount is twice that.

Radiant Barriers: work differently than thermal insulation. They reflect the heat away from the thermal insulation, instead of slowing the heat transfer through it. This effectively increases the performance of your thermal insulation in your attic by 50% to 70%. Radiant barriers work best if they are installed between the attic insulation and the roof sheathing, and when they are sloped so that dust will not accumulate on it as quickly. Furthermore, radiant barriers are fairly inexpensive and easy to install.

Your last step is to determine if you are going to add thermal insulation, a radiant barrier, or both. If your house already has what is the code minimum in many locations of R-30, adding a radiant barrier should boost its effectiveness to 45 or even 50. Or if you have an old house with 5 ½" of fiberglass or cellulose (R-17 to R-20) and you add another R-19 and a radiant barrier, you effective insulation value should be between 54 and 65.

Reflective Insulation

Insulating Walls and Ceilings

You've read all of the articles and know all the pro's and con's to the attic insulation called radiant barrier. Now what? You need to ask yourself two vital questions and they are:

1. Does my attic have ductwork?
2. What is the climate conditions in my area (hot, cold?)
3. What are the install methods of radiant barrier and which one should I use?

We're going to start by answering question number 3 first and tell you what the install methods of radiant barrier are.

The two prominent methods of installation are: stapling your reflective insulation to your roof rafters or just laying your reflective insulation over your previous traditional attic insulation. Each method has pro's and con's however, in order to make an informed decision you will need to answer question two.

However, if there is ductwork in the attic you may lean towards stapling the radiant barrier to your attics rafters. According the Department of Energy this is the optimal installation process in order to minimize summer heat gain and winter heat loss in the warmer climates. Though it is up for some debate on which method is better for energy savings.

It doesn't matter which install method you decide on. You will see energy savings with it. The staple-up method results in the minimum overall heat gain into your home. Both of these methods of installing radiant barrier is going to make your home feel more comfy and save you money on your utility bills.


Roof Insulation Cost Texas