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Attic insulation is important to control soaring energy costs of heating and cooling your home today, it’s more important then ever before to ensure that it is properly insulated. In some older homes that were built back some seventy or eighty years ago, you may not have any Attic Insulation Cost at all in the walls, and very little in the attic. Although the costs of re-insulating an existing home are much greater then new home construction, the long term benefits in reduced heating and cooling costs will make up the difference.

Today’s Attic Insulation Cost in Texas comes in many different forms as far as the ways in which they are applied, and the materials that are used in their manufacturing. You can use the Attic Insulation Cost that is synonymous with Owens Corning who also offer attic blanket insulation for unfinished attics, to spray foam, and rigid foam as well. Each type provides for different uses, and each type will have a different ‘R’ value. The ‘R’ value is the rating system that determines the Attic Insulation Cost over all heat reducing qualities. The higher the ‘R’ value, the better insulator it will be.

Insulation Sheets

The classic fiberglass insulation comes in what are known as ‘batts’. Usually in four foot by one and a half foot strips. These are designed to fit nicely in between the studs of a wall. They should fit snuggly into the wall, but should never be compressed to fit. When you compress fiberglass insulation it loses much of its ‘R’ value. They are also very easy to cut to fit with the use of a sharp utility knife.

If you’re insulating a building or a basement where the looks are not important, such as a warehouse, then the best solution would be to use a spray on foam insulation. This foam can be sprayed overtop the existing interior of the building, it then expands and dries to form a well sealed surface. This is a nice option because it can get into all those small, unnoticed cracks and holes that may allow for heat loss. You can find spray foam insulation in an open cell or closed cell foam. While the open cell is less expensive, it is also less dense and therefore will have less of an ‘R’ value.

Radiant Barrier Insulation

Shop Insulation

Rigid foam board insulation is often used on the exterior of the home or building. It is installed first, and then the siding is applied over top. Some siding companies like Alcoa, have designed a siding product that combines both. It has the foam insulation bonded directly to the siding itself. This will allow you to save a lot of time during the installation process.

Another common type used in attics is a loose fill, or blown in insulation. Blown in insulation can be made of fiberglass, rock wool or cellulose. It is pumped in through a hose and blown in to the desired location. The ‘R’ value of this type is measured by how thickly it is blown in. Obviously, the thicker it is, the higher the ‘R’ value is. There is also garage door insulation as well as insulation for individual components such as gasket insulation.

Basement Wall Insulation

In order to get the best possible insulating qualities that will serve your purposes, you’ll have to go out and do a little research. Going online is a great place to start, as you can have the information right at your finger tips for easy comparison. If you’re looking for ways to save money, not only in the cold winter months, but also in the hot simmer ones, then improving the insulation in your Texas home is the first place you need to start.

Radiant Barrier Foil

How To Install Blown In Attic Insulation

You've read all of the articles and know all the pro's and con's to the attic insulation called radiant barrier. Now what? You need to ask yourself two vital questions and they are:

1. Does my attic have ductwork?
2. What is the climate conditions in my area (hot, cold?)
3. What are the install methods of radiant barrier and which one should I use?

We're going to start by answering question number 3 first and tell you what the install methods of radiant barrier are.

The two prominent methods of installation are: stapling your reflective insulation to your roof rafters or just laying your reflective insulation over your previous traditional attic insulation. Each method has pro's and con's however, in order to make an informed decision you will need to answer question two.

However, if there is ductwork in the attic you may lean towards stapling the radiant barrier to your attics rafters. According the Department of Energy this is the optimal installation process in order to minimize summer heat gain and winter heat loss in the warmer climates. Though it is up for some debate on which method is better for energy savings.

It doesn't matter which install method you decide on. You will see energy savings with it. The staple-up method results in the minimum overall heat gain into your home. Both of these methods of installing radiant barrier is going to make your home feel more comfy and save you money on your utility bills.

Basement Wall Insulation

Radiant Barrier Insulation Installation

Insulating your attic is a great way to help lower your heating and cooling bills.

Using batts or rolls easily helps you achieve the recommended R-value for better insulating performance.

Ready? Okay, let’s go for it! Use layers of high R-Value insulation like R-30 or 38.

And depending on whether you have some insulation or no insulation, you may need a mix of Kraft-faced and unfaced, but we’ll get to that later.

Here are the tools, supplies and safety gear you’ll need for installation.

Let’s get started.

Insulation comes in rolls or pre-cut batts.

Either works, but we recommend using rolls in your attic to quickly cover a large area.

Just roll out the insulation and cut as needed.

Pre-cut batts are great for areas built at standard dimensions or when it’s easier to move small sections of insulation at a time.

If you’re adding insulation to what’s already there, you need to use unfaced insulation.

Putting Kraft-faced insulation over existing insulation will trap moisture and lead to mold and other problems.

That’s not good.

With existing insulation, all you need to do is add rolls of new unfaced insulation until you reach your desired R-Value.

If you’re insulating an attic that has no existing insulation, you could use Kraft-faced insulation on your first layer because that paper or vapor retarder, will help keep moisture from moving between your home below and the attic.

Before we start insulating the attic from scratch, let’s seal any air leaks with caulk for small gaps and foam for gaps up to three inches.

Then, we need to protect any objects that produce heat, like these can lights, by building a baffle.

A baffle is like a box that you place around the heat source.

You can construct one using cardboard or rigid foam.

This will need to keep insulation at least three inches away from the object.

Ventilation is incredibly important with attic insulation.

Be sure to use a vent chute so the fiberglass doesn’t come into contact with the underside of the roof.

Now that all that’s done, we can get down to it.

Measure your joist cavity opening to make sure your insulation will fit side to side and end to end.

As you cut down your roll, use a 2x4 and a utility knife on top of your base for a clean, easy cut.

If you have a narrow joist opening, you may need to trim it lengthwise before getting into the attic.

When you’re installing in your attic floor, place the paper side down against the floor to help prevent moisture from moving between your home below and the attic.

The unfaced side should be what you see when you’re finished.

Place your insulation between the joists and press it into place, just like you would with a wall.

You can continue to add rolls of unfaced insulation until you reach your desired R-Value.

Don’t forget about the attic door or hatch! Foamboards and weatherstripping can do the trick.

So that’s insulating attics with rolls or pre-cut batts! Want to see other places in your home where you may need to insulate? Check out these helpful videos.