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Attic insulation is important to control soaring energy costs of heating and cooling your home today, it’s more important then ever before to ensure that it is properly insulated. In some older homes that were built back some seventy or eighty years ago, you may not have any Attic Insulation Cost at all in the walls, and very little in the attic. Although the costs of re-insulating an existing home are much greater then new home construction, the long term benefits in reduced heating and cooling costs will make up the difference.

Today’s Attic Insulation Cost in Texas comes in many different forms as far as the ways in which they are applied, and the materials that are used in their manufacturing. You can use the Attic Insulation Cost that is synonymous with Owens Corning who also offer attic blanket insulation for unfinished attics, to spray foam, and rigid foam as well. Each type provides for different uses, and each type will have a different ‘R’ value. The ‘R’ value is the rating system that determines the Attic Insulation Cost over all heat reducing qualities. The higher the ‘R’ value, the better insulator it will be.

Sheet Insulation

The classic fiberglass insulation comes in what are known as ‘batts’. Usually in four foot by one and a half foot strips. These are designed to fit nicely in between the studs of a wall. They should fit snuggly into the wall, but should never be compressed to fit. When you compress fiberglass insulation it loses much of its ‘R’ value. They are also very easy to cut to fit with the use of a sharp utility knife.

If you’re insulating a building or a basement where the looks are not important, such as a warehouse, then the best solution would be to use a spray on foam insulation. This foam can be sprayed overtop the existing interior of the building, it then expands and dries to form a well sealed surface. This is a nice option because it can get into all those small, unnoticed cracks and holes that may allow for heat loss. You can find spray foam insulation in an open cell or closed cell foam. While the open cell is less expensive, it is also less dense and therefore will have less of an ‘R’ value.

Most Widely Accepted Spray Foam Insulation

Radiant Barrier Insulation

Rigid foam board insulation is often used on the exterior of the home or building. It is installed first, and then the siding is applied over top. Some siding companies like Alcoa, have designed a siding product that combines both. It has the foam insulation bonded directly to the siding itself. This will allow you to save a lot of time during the installation process.

Another common type used in attics is a loose fill, or blown in insulation. Blown in insulation can be made of fiberglass, rock wool or cellulose. It is pumped in through a hose and blown in to the desired location. The ‘R’ value of this type is measured by how thickly it is blown in. Obviously, the thicker it is, the higher the ‘R’ value is. There is also garage door insulation as well as insulation for individual components such as gasket insulation.

Insulation Blanket

In order to get the best possible insulating qualities that will serve your purposes, you’ll have to go out and do a little research. Going online is a great place to start, as you can have the information right at your finger tips for easy comparison. If you’re looking for ways to save money, not only in the cold winter months, but also in the hot simmer ones, then improving the insulation in your Texas home is the first place you need to start.

Radiant Barrier Foil

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Radiant Barrier Insulation is a reflective insulation made mostly out of aluminum. There are lots of different types radiant barrier out there and they all have their specific applications. I know mostly about radiant barrier that is used to retrofit existing homes, specifically adding the insulation to the attic.

There are some radiant barrier types that are used in new constructions which are placed in the walls or under concrete etc but again, I'm focusing mainly on the addition of the material to an existing home on top of the existing attic insulation. When radiant barrier is rolled out on top o the existing attic insulation people can expect so see an average of 17% reduction in their heating and cooling costs.

Some people even claim as much as a 50% reduction in their monthly bills but that's more of an extreme case. The difference comes in how you use your electricity and/or natural gas. If you have an enormous house with giant vaulted ceilings and live in Arizona and like to keep your house at 65 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer then adding radiant barrier might actually save you 50% or so.

But if you have a really small house and you live in a moderate climate and most of your electricity is used for your 5 giant plasma TV's and you only turn the air conditioner on once or twice a summer, then you probably won't see that large of a reduction in your utilities bills. Whether or not you see a reduction in your utilities bills you will most certainly be able to maintain a comfortable temperature in your house much more easily than with only the standard mass insulation (fiberglass, cellulose, styrofoam etc).

The most cost effective way to install the radiant barrier insulation into your attic is to simply lay it on top of the existing insulation. If you're going to do this just make sure that you use material that allows water vapor to pass through it so you don't have any moisture condensation problems. And just follow the directions provided to you by the manufacturer. If the manufacturer doesn't provide instructions then you should choose a different manufacturer. If you're going to hire someone to do it then make sure they are bonded and insured so that if they fall through your roof you won't be stuck with the bill.

Reflective Insulation

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Scenario:

I have just completed an addition to my house. I've heard that blown in insulation is better than batts since covers the joists completely and leaves no open areas. Do you have any do it yourself suggestions?

Solution:

Yes you are correct. Blown in insulation is better that batts when installed properly as it does seal the attic better.

First you need to measure your attic area that you plan on insulating. Most attics require a value of R-30, R-38 or R-49, depending on your climate and location. Once you know the square footage of your attic you can determine how much insulation you'll need by simple looking on the chart located on the bag of insulation.

Before you get started you will need to determine what materials you will need. Assuming your home has recessed lights, ceiling and bathroom fans and eave vents you will need the following tools and materials:

Loose Fill Insulation

Cardboard Baffles

Flashing

Duct Tape

Staple Hammer and Staples

Utility Knife

Ladder

Insulation Blowing Machine (Available at your local rental store)

I've found blowing insulation into the attic is a simple process. Start and the far ends of the attic. Going back and forth make sure its level and smooth. Make sure to get all areas of the attic and don't fill any vents or recessed light areas. Take a tape measure with you and check the levels once in a while. As an example, if your installing an R-38 of fiberglass insulation you would want it to measure 16 inches deep. As you work your way back near the attic access make sure your helper is getting that excess hose out of the way. When you get to about 6 feet from the access hole stop the machine so you can get on the ladder. Once on the ladder finish installing, making sure to bring the level evenly against the dam you previously built.

The final step is to place a piece of batt insulation in the access hole and carefully put the attic hole lid back into place. Now your done! Stay out of that attic as much as possible from this point as loose fill insulation that has been stepped on or crushed looses it's R value.